Fifty years ago, on July 20th at 20:17 UTC American commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on the surface of the moon. Neil Armstrong was equipped with a silver Hasselblad Data Camera (HDC) paired with a Zeiss Biogon 60mm F/5.6 lens and 70mm film magazine. The second camera, with a Zeiss Planar 80mm f/2.8 lens, was used to shoot from inside the Eagle module. Michael Collins had the third machine onboard the command module Columbia in lunar orbit. Due to stringent weight requirements, only Michael Collins’ camera returned to earth.

In New York, Medium Format Magazine recently participated in the special event announcing the brand-new modular system comprised of the 907X digital camera and CFV II 50C digital back. The special black edition of those units is the beginning of a major launch of this innovative system rooted in the rich history of the brand.  

Key features of the 907X Special Edition include:

  • Large medium format 50MP CMOS sensor
  • Up to 14 stops of dynamic range
  • Captures 16-bit RAW images and full resolution JPEGs
  • High-resolution 3.0-inch 920K dot touch and tilt screen
  • Smooth live-view experience with a high frame rate of 60fps
  • Focus peaking, enabling more accurate focusing (especially advantageous on the manual-focused V System cameras)
  • Intuitive user interface with swipe and pinch touch controls
  • Internal battery slot with the option to recharge in-camera via the USB-C port (same battery used on the X System)
  • Dual UHS-II SD card slots
  • Integrated Wi-Fi and USB-C connection
  • Portable workflow with Phocus Mobile 2 support

One of the most important pieces of information for medium format photographers is the price of this special edition release. The 907X Special Edition is $7,499 or €6,500. Why is it important? Given the special edition version of the camera, we can assume that the regular version, which will be released later, could be priced even more attractively introducing the Hasselblad system to a new generation of photographers and enthusiasts. We will be covering the system as it becomes available for testing. 

Hasselblad provides a link where you can download the images taken on the lunar surface with the HDC and read the original 1969 press release. You can check it out here.

Also, for those of you who would like to learn more about the history of Hasselblad, make sure to check out Take Kayo’s article, “The Ingenuity and Serendipity of the Hasselblad V-System,” in the July issue of the Medium Format Magazine. Take Kayo guides us through the history of Hasselblad’s camera development which will impress you and help you to appreciate the latest announcements from this iconic brand. 

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